Motorcycle roadworthy certificate Melbourne 2017-01-26T05:12:26+00:00

Motorcycle roadworthy certificates

Roadworthy Certificate Information

Raceway is a Licensed Vehicle Teste

We are a licensed vehicle tester for Victorian motorcycle roadworthy certificates.

We can carry out your motorcycle roadworthy test and perform any services required to get your bike up to standard so that you can get your certificate. We are happy to answer any questions you have so give us a call.

Call us to book in your roadworthy on 03 9351 0055

licensed-motorcycle-roadworthy-tester
To be allowed on public roads in Victoria, a motorcycle must be registered. This page contains instructions on how to register your motorcycle, including conditions and eligibility for recreation and farm motorcycle registration.

If your registration has expired by less than 3 months, you can still renew your vehicle’s registration.

A motorcycle is a 2 wheeled motor vehicle and includes a motorcycle with a trailer, forecar or sidecar attached.

A motorcycle can be registered as a:

  • standard motorcycle
  • recreational motorcycle, or
  • farm motorcycle (“farm bike”).
    Different eligibility and conditions apply to farm and recreational motorcycle registration.

Note: If you have purchased your new motorcycle through a dealership, the dealership may arrange the registration on your behalf at the time of purchase.

A motorcycle can be registered in the name of an individual or a corporation (company or incorporated association).

Individuals

To register your motorcycle, your age must be at least 17 years and 9 months.

If you are a minor, your car can be registered in someone else’s name (e.g. a parent, guardian or sibling) until you reach the minimum age.

To operate a motorcycle, you must be the holder of an appropriate motorcycle learner permit or licence. Learner and probationary riders are only allowed to ride motorcycles approved for novice riders under the Learner Approved Motorcycle Scheme (LAMS). For more information view our Motorcycle licence and learner permit restrictions page.

Corporations

A company or incorporated association can have a motorcycle registered in its name.

Companies have an Australian Company Number (ACN). Incorporated associations will not have an ACN but may be incorporated in a number of ways e.g. through an Act of Parliament or by Royal Charter. They may include organisations such as hospitals, municipal councils or trade unions.

Who cannot register a motorcycle

Motorcycles cannot be registered in a business name, trading name or the name of an unincorporated group. If the motorcycle is owned by an unincorporated body, multiple people or an emergency response organisation (e.g. SES, CFA or municipality vehicles), an individual may be nominated as the registered operator.

Recreation registration allows you to ride a motorcycle in defined areas without having full registration.

Eligibility

To register your motorcycle as recreational, you must be at least 17 years and 9 months old.

To operate a recreational motorcycle, you must be the holder of an appropriate motorcycle learner permit or licence. Learner and probationary riders are only allowed to ride motorcycles approved for novice riders under the Learner Approved Motorcycle Scheme (LAMS). For more information view our Motorcycle licence and learner permit restrictions page.

Minimum construction requirements

All recreation motorcycles must have:

  • a rear vision mirror fitted to the right hand side
  • brakes fitted to both wheels, capable of working independently if one brake fails
  • one head lamp
  • one rear red tail lamp
  • one rear red brake lamp
  • one rear white number plate lamp
  • a silencing device which restricts the noise level to 94 dBA or less
  • an appropriate horn or warning device wired into the motorcycle’s electrical system
  • a chain guard that protects the rider from the front chain sprocket.

Important

  • All lighting used must be of a type intended for use on motorcycles.
  • A ‘total loss system’ * power source for the lighting is not acceptable.
  • If a battery is fitted to the motorcycle, an integrated charging system, such as an alternator, is required.
  • Magneto driving lights are acceptable if a battery is not fitted.

* A ‘Total loss’ system is one where the lights are powered in such a way that continuous power to the lights is not possible. For example, lights powered by batteries are not continuously rechargeable and can therefore run down. This is a safety measure to ensure that lighting is available to the rider when it is required.

Conditions

There are a number of conditions applying to operating a recreation vehicle. They are:

  • recreation motorcycles are only permitted to be operated on roads (except declared freeways and arterial roads, including roads formerly designated as forest roads, under the Road Management Act 2004) that are:
    • located outside “built up areas” as defined by speed zones of less than 100 km/h, or
    • those areas that are not a road and are solely for the training and assessment of a holder of a motorcycle learner permit by an organisation approved by VicRoads for that purpose
  • the vehicle must not carry any load or a person other than the rider
  • the rider must wear a protective helmet of the type approved under the Road Rules Victoria.

For more information on eligibility requirements and defined areas view our Recreation motorcycle registration [PDF 408 kb] information sheet.

Primary producers can conditionally register non-Australian Design Rules (ADR) compliant motorcycles for use on Victorian roads between farm properties for primary production activities.

Agricultural motorcycle (farm bike) registration allows you to ride a farm bike on parts of the Victorian road network within a 25 kilometre radius of a farm property without having full registration. 

Eligibility

To register your motorcycle as a farm bike, you must be at least 17 years and 9 months old.

Only two-wheeled motorcycles that do not meet the ADR for general road use can be conditionally registered as farm bikes and will be issued farm bike identifying number plates. ADR compliant motorcycles are not eligible for farm bike registration and will continue to be fully registered with general issue motorcycle number plates.

To operate a farm bike, you must be the holder of an appropriate motorcycle learner permit or licence.  Learner and probationary riders are only allowed to ride motorcycles approved for novice riders under the Learner Approved Motorcycle Scheme (LAMS). For more information view our Motorcycle licence and learner permit restrictions page.

Minimum construction requirements

All farm bikes must have general construction that does not compromise the safety of its operator or any other person. In addition they must have:

  • a rear vision mirror fitted to the right hand side
  • brakes fitted to both wheels, capable of working independently if one brake fails
  • one head lamp
  • one rear red tail lamp
  • one rear red brake lamp
  • one rear white number plate lamp
  • a silencing device which restricts the noise level to 94 dBA or less
  • an appropriate horn or warning device wired into the motorcycle’s electrical system
  • a chain guard that protects the rider from the front chain sprocket.

Important

  • All lighting used must be of a type intended for use on motorcycles.
  • A ‘total loss system’* power source for the lighting is not acceptable.
  • If a battery is fitted to the motorcycle, an integrated charging system, such as an alternator, is required.
  • Magneto driven lights are acceptable if a battery is not fitted.

* A ‘total loss’ system is one where the lights are powered in such a way that continuous power to the lights is not possible. For example, lights powered by batteries are not continuously rechargeable and can therefore run down. This is a safety measure to ensure that lighting is available to the rider when it is required.

Conditions that apply to farm bikes

There are a number of conditions applying to operating a farm bike. They are:

  • farm bikes are to be registered in the name of a primary producer and used solely for the purpose of primary production
  • farm bikes are only permitted to be operated on roads within a 25km radius of the nominated farm property that are:
    • located outside “built up areas” (built up areas are defined as zones where buildings or street lights are less than 100 metres apart),
    • not declared a freeway under the Road Management Act 2004,
  • when operating on the Victorian road network:
    • the farm bike must not carry a person other than the rider
    • the rider must wear a protective helmet of the type approved under the Road Rules Victoria
    • farm bikes can only carry a load if the manufacturer’s specifications say it is safe to do so
    • the operator of a farm bike must carry a copy of the certificate of approved operations (operating conditions) issued at the time of registration
  • applications to travel beyond the prescribed 25km radius will be considered on a case by case basis.

Who issues certificates

A Certificate of Roadworthiness can only be issued when a vehicle is passed by a licensed vehicle tester, operating from a nominated garage or service station. A certificate is only issued when a vehicle passes the inspection.

Find out more about the Roadworthiness scheme.

How long does a certificate remain current

A current certificate of roadworthiness, required for the purpose of registering or transferring a vehicle, is one that has been issued not more than 30 days prior to any application for the registration or transfer.

Note: This is not a guarantee that a vehicle with a roadworthy certificate will necessarily continue to remain in a roadworthy condition for 30 days from the date the certificate was issued.

The cost of certificate

The cost of obtaining a certificate is not fixed and can depend on the age, type and the condition of the vehicle. You can ask for a quote from a Licensed Vehicle Tester.

If the vehicle fails the test

If an item fails to meet the requirements, the tester will issue a rejection report. You will be given 7 days to repair or replace the rejected items and have those rejected item inspected again. If more than 7 days elapse a full inspection is then required.

What is inspected

The inspection is a check of the vehicle to ensure that the key components are in a fit condition for safe road use. It includes:

  • wheels and tyres
  • steering, suspensions and braking systems
  • seats and seatbelts
  • lights and reflectors
  • windscreen, and windows including front wipers and washers
  • vehicle structure
  • other safety related items on the body, chassis or engine.

View the Vehicle standards information VSI26 – Roadworthiness requirements [PDF 415 Kb] for further information on the Inspection standards for the Roadworthiness test.

What is not inspected

The roadworthiness test is not a check of the mechanical reliability or general condition of the vehicle.

The certificate does not mean:

  • that the vehicle is in top condition without any wear or deterioration
  • non-safety related accessories such as the air conditioner, rear window demister, electric windows and rear-window wipers are working
  • that the items checked during the roadworthy inspection will continue to function after the inspection e.g. a brake light can stop functioning at any time after the inspection.

The roadworthiness test is not a complete assessment of a vehicle’s compliance with the Standards for Registration, which in most cases are the Australian Design Rules (ADRs). The ADRs are set a set of minimum standards for the construction of motor vehicles and trailers. Compliance with these standards cannot be assessed by inspection alone.

If you require a comprehensive vehicle inspection

If you require a comprehensive check on the overall condition and reliability of the vehicle then you should arrange for a separate independent vehicle inspection report.

Request a roadworthy test